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Fashion Law Pop-Up Clinic

Fordham Law student - now alum! - Adrienne Montes welcoming Fashion Law Pop-Up clinic attendees

Next clinic: January 22, 2021

(Appointment required)

Volunteer

Request assistance

Pop-up_clinic_Adrienne_Montes_March_2011_resized-pz

 

We’re here to help! A key part of the Fashion Law Institute’s mission is providing legal assistance to designers and fashion industry professionals, not only in the form of educational programming but also by offering free legal consultations. Long before the launch of the Institute, we realized that there was no fashion-specific pro bono legal program available, and that many emerging and independent designers lacked access to basic legal advice tailored to the fashion industry. With the help of the CFDA, we set out to fill that information gap.

Our series of Fashion Law Pop-Up Clinics matches each individual designer with a volunteer attorney who has both fashion experience and expertise related to the question at hand, along with an advanced student studying fashion law for extra assistance. (We came up with the “pop-up” name as a nod to retail pop-up stores – and a way to distinguish this program from traditional law school clinical courses.)

If you are a designer with a question or an attorney who would like to volunteer, please click here or email us for more information. Designers and other fashion industry professionals, please understand that we do not ordinarily arrange legal counsel apart from the Fashion Law Pop-Up Clinics and that space in this popular program is limited.

10th Annual Symposium

So, 2020. Every year our annual symposium is the highlight of the fashion law calendar, but as the coronavirus spread last spring, we postponed it and instead offered you the first online panel on fashion and the pandemic – and realized that hundreds more participants were able to join us simultaneously from all over the world.

We now bring you our 10th Annual Symposium, Silver Linings, running for four consecutive Fridays during fashion month and beyond. The pandemic may keep us working from home in loungewear for the moment, but we can still come together as a fashion law community to celebrate, interrogate, and advance the substance of style. YOU are the silver lining of 2020, and we look forward to seeing you online soon!

DATE: September 25 and October 2, 9, and 16, 2020
TIME: 8:45-10:00am New York time
NYS CLE: 6 hours total (see individual panels for details)
PLACE: Zoom webinar

SCHEDULE:

Quicksilver Deals: Tiffany v. LVMH and M&A in a pandemic
September 25, 2020
NYS CLE: 1.5 professional practice, transitional & non-transitional

SPEAKERS

Avery S. Fischer, EVP, GC, & Secretary, Ralph Lauren
Mark Fischer, EVP, GC, & Secretary, PVH
Vincent Fuller II, Associate, Fried Frank
Brien M. Wassner, Partner, Sidley Austin
MODERATOR: Professor Susan Scafidi, Founder & Director, Fashion Law Institute at Fordham

Heirloom Silver: The afterlife of brands
October 2, 2020
NYS CLE: 1.5 professional practice, transitional & non-transitional

SPEAKERS

Angela Byun, Principal, AB WORLD
Jeffrey Hellman, Vice President and Assistant General Counsel, PVH Corp.
Colette Stanford, SVP-General Counsel, SPARC Group
MODERATOR: Professor Susan Scafidi, Founder & Director, Fashion Law Institute at Fordham
If you missed the panel, watch it here on demand.

Sterling Intentions: Is your diversity & inclusion plan legal?
October 9, 2020
NYS CLE: 1.0 diversity, inclusion, and elimination of bias; .5 ethics

SPEAKERS

Nancy Bishai, General Counsel, APP Group
Fiona W. Ong, Partner, Shawe Rosenthal LLP
Dana Sussman, Deputy Commissioner, Policy and Intergovernmental Affairs, New York City Commission on Human Rights
MODERATOR: Kenya Wiley, Founder and Policy Counsel, Fashion Innovation Alliance
If you missed the panel, watch it here on demand.

Silver Bullet? Mask policies, problems, and solutions
October 16, 2020
NYS CLE: 1.0 professional practice, transitional & non-transitional; .5 ethics

SPEAKERS

Ashley Brown, General Counsel, ONE Management
Abrima Erwiah, Co-Founder and President, Studio One Eighty Nine
Elisheva Hirshman, Vice President, Associate General Counsel, Employment & Litigation, PVH Corp.
John Maltbie, Director of Intellectual Property, Civil Enforcement, Louis Vuitton Americas
MODERATOR: Ariele Elia, Assistant Director, Fashion Law Institute at Fordham

If you registered previously for our 10th Annual Symposium, you will receive a separate email. And thank you!

Registration is free unless you seeking New York State CLE credit or would like a limited edition Fashion Law Institute face mask!

$ 0.00
Pink face mask with Fashion Law Institute needle-and-spool gavel logo on top of books

Media Mentions 2020

2020 (selected)

Is Kamala Harris’s Fashion Her Secret Weapon?
The Wall Street Journal, October 31, 2020

Trick nor Treat: the hounding of Halloween
The Critic, October 30, 2020

This is America: I’m a Black person who loves Halloween. Please stop ruining it for me
USA Today, October 29, 2020

“Stop Cooking Your Watered Down Versions of Asian Food”
Erica Lovelace Cooks, October 28, 2020

Offensive Halloween Costumes You Definitely Shouldn’t Wear
Latin Post, October 27, 2020

Photographer Under Fire for Using A Nude Photo in a Book After the Model Asked Him Not To 
DIY Photography, October 8, 2020

What is Cultural Appropriation? Social Justice Usage
Dayz of Noah, October 26, 2020

Honoring Indigenous Wellness Practices
Similar Souls on Fire, October 12, 2020

US Legal Protections for TK & TCES, Gaps in Protection, and Indigenous Peoples’ Initiatives 
Native American Rights Fund, October 19, 2020

Kanye West Wants a Board Seat at Gap and Adidas. We Break Down What That Means and if It’s Possible.
Complex, October 6, 2020

All Shook Up: The Politics of Cultural Appropriation
Dissent, October 5, 2020

CLL Hosts First Virtual Fashion Pop-Up Clinic
Cowan, Leibowitz, & Latman, September 29, 2020

On the Rise: Patricia M. Flanagan
Law.com, September 28, 2020

Can Black Lives Matter Finally Fix the Fashion Industry?
Cosmopolitan, September 25, 2020

This year’s election matters to fashion and humanity more than ever
Fashionista, September 24, 2020

For Fashion Week, the industry tries to reinvent itself
Marketplace, September 24, 2020

Belgian designer accuses Virgil Abloh of copying. Again.
Art Daily, September 18, 2020

When Non-Native People Burn Sage, It’s Cultural Appropriation—And We Don’t Support It
Well + Good, September 18, 2020

COVID Crisis in Fashion Industry Affects Women and Families, Fordham Experts Say
Fordham News, September 15, 2020

Demystifying Your Office Dress Code Policy
Eden, September 10, 2020

What is cultural appropriation? Examples and definition of the term after Adele is criticised for use of Bantu Knots
The Scotsman, September 2, 2020

What is the definition of cultural appropriation – and why is it bad?
Horncastle News, September 2, 2020

Decoding Fashion Industry: Need for Fashion Law
Legal Wires, September 1, 2020

Is The ‘Fox Eye’ Makeup Trend Racist Toward Asians?
Huffpost, August 31, 2020

Mexico: Fashion Law
ECIJA, August 27, 2020

Belgian Designer Accuses Virgil Abloh of Copying. Again.
The New York Times, August 13, 2020

Comic Book Legal Defense Fund Names Interim Director
Hollywood Reporter, August 13, 2020

So Ordered: The Messy Nature of Dress Codes
Die Workwear, August 13, 2020

Brands Claim Their Clothes Kill Viruses. Will Consumers Buy It?
Business of Fashion, August 10, 2020

Forever 21 goes from rags to riches to bankruptcy court
Spectacular Failures, August 10, 2020

The Difference Between Cultural Appropriation and Cultural Appreciation
Passion Passport, August 7, 2020

SUSTAINABILITY AND INNOVATION
Italian American Chamber of Commerce, July 28, 2020

Careers in Geek Fashion
ComicCon@Home2020, July 26, 2020

“Crazy” Talk: Mental Health, Pop Culture, and the Pandemic
ComicCon@Home 2020, July 24, 2020

Will Halloween be canceled? What costumes will be culturally appropriate amid racial reckoning
ABC News, July 22, 2020

Cultural Appropriation Was Always Inexcusable
Instyle, July 15, 2020

Kanye West’s Deal with Gap is Unprecedented. Here’s Why.
Complex, July 13, 2020

Brooks Brothers files for bankruptcy
Marketplace, July 8, 2020

Are Robots Coming For Models’ Jobs?
Elle, July 8, 2020

Fashion and law are increasing the degree courses and masters
Il Sole 24, July 8, 2020

The new corporate swag: Branded masks, sanitizer spray bottles and Zoom vanity light rings
Washington Post, July 2, 2020

Why Fashion Brands and Their Retail Landlords Are Suing Each Other
Business of Fashion, June 26, 2020

Stephen Sidkin speaking at UAL and Fashion Law Institute webinar, 25 June 2020
Fox Williams, June 24, 2020

Best Graduate Schools
US News, June 23, 2020

Guide to Career in Fashion Law; Work Profile, Opportunities and Scope
Legal Desire, June 22, 2020

A Guide to Understanding and Avoiding Cultural Appropriation
ThoughtCo., June 18, 2020

Fashion questions now – Professor Susan Scafidi & Jeff Trexler
University of the Arts London, June 16, 2020

Lessons Learned: Alumni Reflect on Navigating New Careers in Tough Times
Fordham Law News, June 11, 2020

Innovative Solutions to Fast Fashion Challenges
Environmental Law Institute, June 10, 2020

New Remote Networking Program Fosters Alumni-Student Relationships
Fordham Law News, June 4, 2020

TV host Jimmy Fallon apologizes for wearing blackface in old SNL clip after being slammed on social media
Asia Ville News, May 27, 2020

Going Viral: Fashion, Law, and the Coronavirus
Fordham Law News, April 29, 2020

How Fashion Is Navigating The COVID-19 Pandemic
US Chamber of Commerce, April 16, 2020

Collaboration, Compassion Key for Supply Chain Crisis Management 
Sourcing Journal, April 2, 2020

Modeling Agencies Feeling the Pain, Developing Digital Solutions
WWD, March 31, 2020

What Fashion Brands Need to Know about the Stimulus Package
Business of Fashion, March 27, 2020

Experts Unpack the Massive Cross-Industry Impact of the Coronavirus
US Chamber of Commerce, March 20, 2020

Living & Working In the New Reality 
Look Online, March 19, 2020

Fashion as Art: Rights and Remedies in the Age of Social Media
MDPI, March 11, 2020

Coronavirus, Cancellations, and Contracts
WWD, March 10, 2020

Watch the Careers In Gaming Fashion Panel From PAX East 2020
Geekfold, March 5, 2020

The fight for the Phillie Phanatic: Who owns the essence of an iconic mascot?
The Score, March 4, 2020

TikTok teens are obsessed with fake luxury products
CNBC, March 1, 2020

The Law and Ethics on Cultural Appropriation
Durham University, February 28, 2020

How to Tell if your Louis Vuitton is Fake
Budget Fashionista, February 27, 2020

Phillie Phanatic Fight Shines Spotlight on Copyright Licensing
Bloomberg Law, February 26, 2020

The Origin of Fashion Law And It’s Arrival in Spain 
Enrique Ortega Burgos, February 22, 2020

Dressing For The Campaign Trail Can Be Tough For Female Candidates
Washington Post, February 19, 2020

Fashion Laws with comparison
Be Attractive, February 18, 2020

Fashion Between Inspiration and Appropriation
MDPI, February 12, 2020

Forever 21 get $81 Million Stalking-Horse Bid From ABG, Landlords
WWD, February 3, 2020

Can Beyoncé or Adidas Sue Popeyes Over Ivy Park-Inspired Collection?
Complex, January 31, 2020

Fashion Law Speaker- The Intersection of Copyright and Fashion 
Cornell, January 31, 2020

Fashion Law Professional Development Workshop
University of Arts London, January 31, 2020

Creation, Destruction, and the Future of Fashion
Fordham Intellectual Property, Media, & Entertainment Law Journal, January 30, 2020

Albany Strip Club Must Face Carmen Electra Image Use Claims (3) 
Bloomberg Law, January 29, 2020

The Failure of the Forever 21 Empire
January 17, 2020

Rosita Arvigo on Cultural Appropriation
Lotus Womb, January 7, 2020

Multiculturalism, or Culture or Appropriation
City Journal, January 3 , 2020

Thursday 6/25 event: CSM x FLI

Fashion Law Institute gavel logo hitting coronavirus

In a world challenged by COVID-19 lockdowns and other political struggles and ethical concerns, the fashion industry is united in our search for new business strategies. How can fashion designers and businesses protect themselves amidst a global recession? What does the revision of the fashion calendar mean for sales cycles, and should the industry be setting a common calendar at all? What are the best ways for fashion brands and media outlets to address diversity and inclusion? Is sustainability sustainable when companies are struggling to survive? This special event co-hosted with Central Saint Martins will explore how fashion professionals and companies can adapt to these and other emerging challenges, with speakers including Professors Susan Scafidi and Jeff Trexler along with other industry guests.

SPEAKERS INCLUDE:

  • Abisade Adenubi, Heritage Apparels
  • John Maltbie, Louis Vuitton
  • Don M. Obert, The Obert Law Firm
  • Stephen Sidkin, Fox Williams
  • Jeff Trexler, Moda Legal
  • Gary Wassner, Hilldun
  • Moderator: Professor Susan Scafidi, Fashion Law Institute

Register here!

SCOTUS on trans rights, dress codes

Bostock v Clayton County GA Supreme Court ruling header with rainbow filter background

The Supreme Court has released its landmark ruling in Harris Funeral Homes v. EEOC, which is consolidated under Bostock v. Clayton County. Key passages and the whole ruling PDF below — in brief, the Court holds that it is illegal to fire someone for being transgender, but the ruling expressly does not reach the issue of dress codes.

bostock-harris

Fashion Law Bootcamp

Fashion Law Bootcamp - New York and Silicon Valley

Welcome to Bootcamp!

NEXT EDITION:
NEW YORK
JUNE 1-5, 2021

The Fashion Law Institute's unique annual Summer Intensive Program, fondly known as Fashion Law Bootcamp®, is your opportunity to experience the field of fashion law outside of the regular law school curriculum. It's an unparalleled opportunity to delve into the substance of style, with emphasis on current business and legal issues involving the global fashion industry.

The program is run by Professor Susan Scafidi, Founder and Academic Director of the Institute, who pioneered the field of fashion law. She is the first professor to create a course in the area – covering the same material as the Fashion Law Bootcamp® New York edition – and is internationally recognized for her expertise. Participants will also have the opportunity to meet fashion industry leaders and Fashion Law Institute faculty, who teach the Fashion Law curriculum at Fordham Law School and themselves have worked with major brands, such as Tiffany, Kering, LVMH, Wilhelmina, Ford Models, and Conde Nast.

Photo of attendees at Fashion Law Bootcamp next to boot with pink flowers

Fashion Law Bootcamp®  is open to lawyers (and offers CLE credit), fashion industry professionals, law students, design students and alumni, and others in the U.S. and abroad who are interested in broadening their knowledge of the law and business of fashion. The program is an excellent way for fashion industry professionals to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the legal issues that they deal with on a regular basis, or for practicing lawyers to expand their current practice or even jump start a change in career. Individuals who have not yet had academic or practical exposure to the law and business of fashion, including design students entering their final year of study, are eligible to apply but must have a demonstrated scholastic aptitude and willingness to take on the challenge of studying legal materials.

The syllabus is updated every year, with each section taking a fashion-centered focus to help attendees work with the industry more effectively. Topics include

  • intellectual property protection of fashion designs,
  • counterfeiting, 
  • licensing agreements,
  • employment issues from designers to models,
  • antitrust,
  • bankruptcy,
  • fashion and technology, including data security & privacy,
  • fashion finance,
  • local manufacturing, 
  • real estate,
  • retail issues, 
  • consumer protection (including cosmetics and personal care products),
  • ethics, sustainability and green fashion, 
  • import/export regulations and tariffs,
  • endangered species law,  
  • sumptuary laws,
  • masks and personal protective equipment, and
  • dress codes.

APPLY NOW! 

APPLICATIONS OPEN NOW

APPLICATION PROCEDURE
The brief application form is below and is also linked here. Completed applications are reviewed as they are received.

CREDITS 

Law students: Fashion Law Bootcamp does not issue a Fordham transcript; academic credit will need approval from your home institution. For additional information, please read this and email bootcamp@fashionlawinstitute.com
before applying).

Lawyers: Both newly admitted and experienced attorneys will receive a maximum of 28.0 transitional and non-transitional, professional practice New York State CLE credits, for the online edition. We are looking into CLE certification for other jurisdictions.

California CLE credit certification renewal for the San Francisco/Silicon Valley edition is pending; based on previous years, the amount of CLE credits for this version should be 14.0 transitional and non-transitional, professional practice New York State CLE credits, and 12.0 CLE credit hours for California.

CERTIFICATE
Certificates of completion will be awarded to all participants at the conclusion of the program.

VISA
If you are not a U.S. citizen or legal resident and are in or will enter the U.S. as a non-immigrant, you may need a visa to attend Fashion Law Bootcamp. A student visa is NOT required; attendees typically use a B-2 or B-1 visa depending on their particular interests, or, for qualified countries, the visa waiver program. Please email us for more information.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION about Fashion Law Bootcamp, please email bootcamp@fashionlawinstitute.com.

DATES

New York: June 1-5, 2021

Silicon Valley: July 2021 (email bootcamp@fashionlawinstitute.com for updates)

CONTENT

The New York edition covers the entire content of Professor Scafidi's pioneering two-credit-hour Fashion Law course.

The Silicon Valley edition covers special topics in fashion law with a technology focus, with sessions at the headquarters of leading brands. More details to be announced!

FEE

New York: $2450, which includes all expenses associated with the program, including materials and optional daytime events.

Silicon Valley: $975, which includes all expenses associated with the program (except for room and board), including printed materials and special events.

DEPOSIT

A $250 deposit is due with the application for either edition or both Bootcamps. The deposit is applied toward the program cost and is non-refundable once accepted into the program. We look forward to receiving your application!

ACCOMMODATIONS

There are a number of places to stay in San Francisco, and surrounding areas. Details are provided in the admittance letter.

Click or drag a file to this area to upload.
Click or drag a file to this area to upload.
Click or drag a file to this area to upload.
A $250 deposit is due with the application. The deposit is applied toward the program cost and is non-refundable (unless not accepted into the program, in which case the deposit is refunded). If you prefer check, money order, or wire transfer, please let us know and we'll provide the requisite information!
$ 0.00

RIP: Dr. Arnauld F. “Scotty” Scafidi, 1937-2020

Professor Scafidi, seated above and looking at her father, Arnauld F. "Scotty" Scafidi

As some of you know, Professor Scafidi’s father passed away on Easter Sunday of natural causes unrelated to the coronavirus. They were very close, and she has posted a tribute on her Facebook page here.

What you may not know is that Dr. Scafidi was effectively given his name by the cosmetics magnate Elizabeth Arden, founder of the iconic Red Door spa & salon chain dramatized in the Broadway musical War Paint and now closed permanently in the wake of the coronavirus.

Before Dr. Scafidi was born, his father, Antone B. Scafidi, was hired by Miss Arden as the star hair stylist for her flagship salon in New York. In keeping with the parlance of the era, he should have been known to all as “Mr. Antone,” but a Polish hairdresser by way of Paris, Monsieur Antoine, had a rival salon down the street at Saks Fifth Avenue. To avoid confusion and a potential trademark issue, Miss Arden decreed that her charismatic and charming stylist would be known as “Mr. Arnauld” – keeping the initial, adding a touch of French savoir faire, and ultimately allowing the name to be pronounced in good New York fashion. When Antone’s first child came along, he eschewed the tradition of naming a first son after his paternal grandfather and instead passed along the more “American” name Arnauld.

Arnauld as an infant, held by his parents, Catherine and Antone Scafidi

Dr. Scafidi didn’t particularly care for the frequently misspelled name and generally went by the high school nickname of Scotty – a story for another day. He did, however, absorb quite a bit of fashion and beauty industry knowledge through his parents as well as family friends and relatives in the business, and he very much enjoyed meeting many of you at the Fashion Law Institute’s 3rd anniversary show under the tents at New York Fashion week in 2013, which happened to coincide with his 50th wedding anniversary.

We offer a stylish sendoff to the father of our Fashion Law Institute founder and send our condolences to the Scafidi family.

In addition, we’d like to extend our sympathy to the many members of our community who are mourning friends and loved ones now, and at the same time struggling with the day-to-day difficulties of the current crisis. We’ll figure this out together and return stronger than ever.

Professor Scafidi and her father